Long-Lost Philip K Dick Manuscript Found?

Long-Lost Philip K Dick Manuscript Found?Hey, this is pretty cool. Someone over at Reddit is claiming to have found a lost manuscript from Philip K. “The Guy Who Wrote the Stories Behind ‘Blade Runner,’ ‘Total Recall,’ ‘A Scanner Darkly,’ and ‘Minority Report'” Dick. PKD’s influence on science fiction is tremendous. The fact that people know him for his work, rather than his notoriously-phallic name, is proof-positive of the evocative, prolific stories he told.

And now they seem to have a lost manuscript of his. Authentication is in progress, but you can enjoy the story now. They’ve posted “Whatever You Do To The Rest Of You, Your Mind Belongs To Lasconte” to Dropbox in PDF, MOBI and EPUB formats. Stay tuned as we follow the story … for nerds, this is like discovering a long-lost Renoit or Mattisse painting. Instead of hording it and teasing us, this nerd is sharing the story with us immediately. GG, anonymous geek! It’s stuff like this that makes the sci-fi community what it is.

 

Please Make Your Own Universe

Ugh, no … please don’t.

Just heard about this new fanfilm of ‘Blade Runner,’ and I have to say that I’m not thrilled. Then I started reading about how production of ‘Axanar’, the Star Trek fan film is also moving forward. I know I’m just one voice, but I want to take this opportunity to say to anyone out there in the sci-fi community: please don’t be a part of this.

The Verge may be drooling and Reddit might be upvoting this, but seriously: it’s a horrible idea. Ironically, Blade Runner itself is one of the reasons why. Continue reading

Totally stealing this …

I know I said dystopia is no longer relevant, but I saw this Reddit comment and it jibes with an element of my upcoming short, ‘The Battle of Victoria Crater.’

We’ve become conditioned to the idea that we NEED to have jobs. Not just to feel useful, but in the sense that if we don’t have jobs we won’t be able to survive, and if you can’t survive it’s your fault … Instead of not having to work being the future we’d all dreamed of, not being able to work means we’re going to starve in the streets.

All sci-fi stories have some kind of ‘what-if’ premise baked into them. Victoria Crater’s premise is: What if this happened on Mars, out of reach of earthbound nations?

Dear Sci-Fi: We Need to Talk – Part Two: The Purity Test

In the week since I posted Part One of this train of thought, I had a couple of conversations that reinforce what I’m saying about the sci-fi community messing itself up. One conversation took place on Reddit itself and the other took place with one of the friends I can – because of my disability – have a normal chat with. “What did you think of Rogue One?” I asked.

“Oh,” he said. “I liked it … but there were a lot of people who were disappointed. They felt like all it did was focus on the one plot point and then …”

“Oh man,” I shook my head. “There it is again, the purity test.”

“What purity test?” Continue reading

It’s About the Story, Stupid

I’m going to avoid adding onto the ‘Dear Sci-Fi: We Need to Talk’ discussion today. I don’t want to add to overall discord of the world, there are way too many scary things going on out there and we come to sci-fi to escape them.

That, in and of itself, may be *why* we argue so much about the state of science fiction. Sci-fi feels fixable, as opposed to the world outside, which looks more like a dystopian nightmare every day.

So although I’m working on something to say because I’m passionate about sci-fi being an open, inclusive world where ideas are free to flourish, I want to do something today to counteract the negative energy. I’m going to just sit here quietly, and be somebody that enjoys science fiction with you. It’s important to be comfortable sharing this space before we do anything else.

Ssh … it’s going to be okay.

 

Sci-Fi: Rebooting the Reboots

Sci-Fi: Rebooting the Reboots

Yes.

Yes, yes and *YES.*

Had to blog about this: read something very encouraging this morning from one of my favorite directors, J.J. Abrams. Like me, he’s tired of sci-fi reboots:

You know, I do think that if you’re telling a story that is not moving anything forward, not introducing anything that’s relevant, that’s not creating a new mythology or an extension of it, then a complete remake of something feels like a mistake.

On behalf of writers and geeks everywhere, let me extend a salute to Mr. Abrams. His as a filmmaker and storyteller have already won my admiration and respect, but now he’s going further. He’s continuing to pivot and innovate, even as he celebrates the reboots he’s already been a part of:

You know, I feel incredibly lucky to have gotten involved in things that I loved when I was a kid. In fact, even Westworld, which we’re here for tonight, is one of them. But I don’t feel any desire to do that again. I feel like I’ve done enough of that that I’m more excited about working on things that are original ideas that perhaps one day someone else will have to reboot.

In one deft move J.J. Abrams is giving himself, and us, permission to reboot the reboots. Bravo. It’s like, enough already. Like mango chutney, reboots are perfect in small doses. The problem is that they’ve gotten out of hand. Even Conan O’Brien openly mocks them:

This comes back to what I was saying earlier – the world is ready for original sci-fi. Yes, we were born to make, not take. But making reboots always felt like we were making by taking and that isn’t fair to the audience. Hopefully this represents a new direction in science fiction that writers like me can be a part of.

Mesh Proposal – Moving Forward!

Happy to say that I got some happy feedback on Mesh from an editor over at Lightspeed:

“I really enjoyed the synopsis of the book! I think this is going to be a great read and will really grab agents’ attention.”

That’s the kind of good news you can hang your entire week on. Looking forward to taking you through the process of putting this in front of an agent / publishing house! 🙂

Dear Sci-Fi: We Need to Talk – Part One

As promised, a special comment about the direction of sci-fi and how it might avoid some of the community-killing habits experienced by other groups of people in 2016. No one argues that science fiction is a genre, a medium of art, that is built upon imagination. However, it has become apparent to me, and perhaps to you as well, that our genre has been overrun by bad habits that will ultimately lead to its own demise.

No community is too big to fail. I’m sure you can think of some recent examples where grass-roots organizations have suffered crises of identity as core beliefs were challenged and then obliterated. Science fiction is also a community, and while it has repelled bad actors in the past, there is no doubt about their intent. Some men, as Alfred reminded us in Dark Knight, just want to watch the world burn.

Each of us have the capacity to become the white blood cells of our ecosystem. We can work together to identify threats, neutralize them, and keep the body healthy. It’s hoped that this Open Letter – a document that I frequently find distasteful – will foster some conversation and perhaps some self-awareness within the sci-fi community. If I am wrong, then count me the first to say that I am happy to be wrong, for this is a community that I both love and want to be a part of for the rest of my life.  Continue reading